Draw Me Democracy Poster

“Draw Me Democracy” is Poster for tomorrow’s new project and it’s also one of the few global projects that the UNDEF, the United Nation Democracy Fund, has ever financed.

The aim of DMD is to help young artists, designers and communication professionals in taking an active role in all democratic and/or human rights-related processes and it wishes of doing so by helping them in finding their own strong creative voice. In this context, the empowerment of women is at the core of DMD priorities.

With these goals in mind, DMD is a series of 16 free of charge, one-week poster design workshops across 15 key countries scattered around Africa, Asia, Eastern Europe and Latin America.
The workshops aim to strengthen the participants knowledge and skills in the fields of design, social communication and advocacy advertising.

The experience will come full circle after 6 months follow up, when few more workshops will take place in some of the 15 countries or even in some new ones in order to make more designers benefit this initiative.


Ongoing Projects

Do The Right Thing


In a world that is becoming increasingly polarised, perhaps the one thing that unites us all is the conviction that we are all acting for the right reasons. And having formed...

Free Patrick Zaki


The call for entries to “Free Patrick Zaki, prisoner of conscience”, a special edition of Poster For Tomorrow, will be open from 8 to 28 January. The competition is...

FAKE NEWS!


Fake news might feel like a recent development that has only come to prominence since the election of one politician who shall not be named, but the practice of spreading...

FAKE NEWS!

Fake news might feel like a recent development that has only come to prominence since the election of one politician who shall not be named, but the practice of spreading rumours and misinformation is as old as the printed word.

People have always twisted the truth, or simply told lies, to get what they want (or change the world). But now we have the ability to share information faster and wider than ever before. It used to be only a few media outlets or government sources that could shape public thought, but now everyone can.

And unlike the media or government, none of us are held accountable for what we post. As there are few laws or fines that can be thrown at us for posting lies, there is no incentive to act responsibly in the public sphere. Get likes (or votes) first, worry about potential consequences later. If the self-styled leader of the free world can’t be held to account for regularly tweeting and spreading blatant untruths, then what stops everybody else from doing the same?